Tim Tebow: Does God Really Care About Football?
by Rich Deem

Introduction

Tim Tebow has been a popular NFL quarterback since being drafted by the NFL Denver Broncos after winning the Heisman Trophy. Although a stellar quarterback in college, his throwing abilities are not as strong as those of other top NFL quarterbacks. Still he finds a way to win games—and give praise to Jesus Christ, which is probably why NFL fans seem to either love him or hate him. Are Tebow's performances a result of his religious belief? Does God really care about football?

Too much religion?

Tim Teblow tends to make some of this fellow players nervous. It's not so much his football performances that have them worried as much as his outward display of faith. He is always giving thanks and praise to Jesus Christ. In college, he always had a verse (e.g., John 3:16) written in his eye shadow. Tebow even started his own foundation to help disadvantaged people throughout the world. Tebow is not doing all these religious things to make people feel uneasy. He just really believes that Jesus deserves praise for some of his God-given abilities.

Does God care about football?

Karl Marx once said that "religion is the opiate of the masses."1 At this point in history, one would have to say that sports are the current opiates of the people. Large numbers of sports fans are willing to shell out multi-million dollar salaries to men who are good at throwing, hitting, or kicking various size balls on different sports teams. In a world where millions of children are starving, it seems like a poor use of available resources. Still, as a member of the Y-chromosome group, I enjoy watching football and basketball. There are always a number of sports figures who give credit to God for their victories (but not usually their loses). Does God really care about sports and who wins or who loses? Despite God's probable indifference to competitive sports, there is a biblical principle that dominates life in general. The Apostle Paul said "...whatever you do, do all to the glory of God (1 Corinthians 10:31). So, although God probably doesn't care whether that Denver Broncos win football games, He does care that people fulfill the two great commandments—to love God and love our neighbor (Matthew 22:37-40). Because of God's great works on our behalf, we are told to "continually offer up a sacrifice of praise to God" and "give thanks to His name" (Hebrews 13:15). This is exactly what Tim Tebow does, both on and off the field. Will God continue to bless Tim Tebow? Likely!

Why does God love Tim Tebow?

Yes, God does love Tim Tebow. However, He doesn't love Tebow, simply because he is always praising God. The fact is that God loves all human beings, including those who spend most of their time watching sports and drinking beer (although He might prefer they do other things!). God loves all people because He created them in His image. He wants them to choose to return His love and live with Him forever. The only thing God asks in return is belief in His Son, whom He sent to provide the model for us and the sacrifice to pay for our sins. It sounds like a deal too good to be true, but it is true. Once you believe, God's love can flow through you as it does through Tim Tebow.

Conclusion Top of page

Tim Tebow loves Jesus. It shows in his attitude, his work ethic and the way he treats other people. Is Tebow too good? That's not possible, since God wants perfection. However, He will "settle" for faith in Jesus Christ. God loves Tim Tebow, but no more than He loves you and I. It is through faith in Jesus that we may enter into the joy that He offers. Yes, it is better than beer and football. May God bless you.



References Top of page

  1. To be fair, the context does not sound as bad as the "sound bite." "Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world, just as it is the spirit of a spiritless situation. It is the opium of the people."

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Last Modified December 1, 2011

 

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